AuthorObaro E

In my 20s, I was a contrarian. While studying for my PhD in neuroscience, I learned to defend opinions and ideas based on empirical evidence. And on social media I would make mildly controversial arguments for entertainment and all my friends would laugh, join in, debate and have fun and we would all 'shake hands' afterwards and get on with our lives... that is until around 2012 when I argued against feminism...

Caitlin Moran’s 12 nonsensical ramblings for a male-feminist recruitment drive

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Using the standard specious logic, dodgy stats, and sleaze-laden self-deprecating humour common to feminism’s publicity drives, Caitlin Moran recently took to the men’s magazine Esquire to school men about the wonders of feminism. I held my nose and went through the article with an anti-feminist fine tooth comb to expose the female supremacy nonsense and abject misandry coursing through her...

What next for feminism – video rebuttal

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On January 26th, 2016, Jenni Russell – a columnist for The Times, The Sunday Times, and the Evening Standard, chaired a debate entitled ‘What next for feminism?’ at the Emmanuel Centre in West London. The panel consisted of international lawyer and political scientist Anne-Marie Slaughter, feminist historian and author Amanda Foreman, Darwinian Philosopher Helena Cronin, Neuroscientist and...

Justice Department Guidance on Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence

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In December, 2015, the US Department of Justice (DoJ), issued new guidelines to to help law enforcement agencies (LEAs) prevent gender bias in their response to sexual assault and domestic violence. The Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), the Civil Rights Division and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) collaborated to produce the guidance...

Seven blind feminists feel up an imaginary Elephant

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According to a survey carried out by top female executives in the tech industry, 60% of women in tech reported unwanted sexual advances. Of these, around two thirds say these advances were from a superior colleague. The survey called ‘Elephant in the Valley’ was inspired by the discourse surrounding the Ellen Pao & KPCB trial – in which the former sued her then employer, Kleiner Perkins...

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