Conspicuous silence

C

Hi again badgers! Belthazor3457 again, remember me? I made a video talking about life at private religious schools recently and observed an interesting reaction in regard to feminists. The video was posted on the atheism reddit and a couple other subreddits, but despite presenting a clear issue that effected women (and men) in the video in regard to enforcement of gender roles, a couple subreddits it was conspicuously absent on were r/women and r/feminism.

In the video I mostly discuss science class interpretations but I do touch on gender roles for part of it, and despite it having been shared some, feminists were oddly silent – how interesting considering it involved sex ed and girls being “educated” that they were like used gum once they lost their virginity – one would think a feminist would chomp at the bit to complain about it, but… nothing. Crickets. Silence.

I waited for a week and i still havn’t found the slightest mention on either r/women or r/feminism, and I think I know why: the video deals with poor quality religious education that effects lower-class and lower-middle-class people in america, not wealthy upper-middle-class people going to good universities who have time to sit on tumblr all day.

Seemingly these people are concerned exclusively with imminent enhancement of their already existing benefits, at exclusion of all others – this would explain why feminists don’t seem to care about women in poverty-stricken nations and their resounding silence on draft registration in the USA – poor women go to low-quality religious schools that don’t have med staff or janitors etc, so why talk about it if it can’t conceivably benefit them on the individual level in the near future?

I think this might explain some of the otherwise-strange topic focus of
feminists. Thoughts?

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestmailby feather

About the author

Badger Mail

<span class="dsq-postid" data-dsqidentifier="153865 http://honeybadgerbrigade.com/?p=153865">4 comments</span>

  • Hey, I found your video’s, that’s a fucked up situation and explains why some people seem to be so delusional when it comes to their religion.

    On to your question; I think the feminists or other groups concerned with gender disparities like this one didn’t comment on your video because your primary focus is on religion, not gender. I think most Internet feminists are actually overly concerned with lower class women, especially of color. They aren’t usually shy to criticize Christianity but they go easy on other religions like Islam en Hinduism as they are considered part of the culture of those minority groups. Bottom line, there are many things wrong with feminism but your logic here doesn’t make sense.

    PS: I don’t know if it was up on this site before but I think you should put a link to your videos in the article.

  • “the video deals with poor quality religious education that effects lower-class and lower-middle-class people in america, not wealthy upper-middle-class people going to good universities who have time to sit on tumblr all day.”

    People have been pointing this out for decades now. The early feminists were all posh parasites and the tradition continues. Working class and/or non-white feminists get told essentially to remember their place and nothing is an issue unless it’s an issue for white women with the right level of opportunities. Everyone else is boring except as a victim group to milk for solidarity when feminists “appropriate their oppression.”

    • Sure, feminism has been has been a mostly upper-class thing. But in his video there’s 1 or 2 lines about gender… so to conclude from the number of comments that feminists don’t care about poor women is just not rational. From what I see very few people have been sharing his video anyway. It’s a shame because it isn’t half bad.

  • I saw one video that claimed the original feminists were Hermeticists and Theosophists. The argument was that feminism was a new age spiritualist belief that the male centered age we live in would help give birth to a female centered one.

By Badger Mail

Events

Follow Us

Facebooktwitterrssyoutubeby feather

Support Hannah Wallen’s HBR Talk

Categories

Archives

Tags