Honey Badger Radio: Brian Banks and the Social Rapist

Show Notes

 

Wanetta Gibson. Wanetta Gibson. That’s the woman who falsely accused Brian Banks of rape in 2002. Even though there was no physical evidence to corroborate Wanetta Gibson’s testimony and her story that he had dragged her, protesting, past five class rooms full of students without anyone noticing was far from plausible, Brian Banks was threatened with being tried as an adult and pressured to take a plea deal.
His plea deal got him 6 years in jail, 5 years probation and a life sentence on the sex offender registry.
All based solely on a woman’s testimony. Despite the lack of physical evidence, despite the implausibility, despite the inconsistencies of the tall tale, Brian Banks was not exonerated until he’d served his full sentence and recorded his rapist fessing up to her crime.
Did we say rapist? Why yes we did. Because we do have a rape culture, one in which women can socially rape men with impunity.
Join us on Honey Badger Radio as we discuss the Brian Banks case and other cases of false allegation.
Or as we prefer to call it, social rape.
Show time: 9 PM EST/ 8 PM CST/ 6 PM PST
Show date: 21/11/2013
Website: www.honeybadgerbrigade.com

Alison Tieman
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Alison Tieman

Artist/Writer at Xenospora
Alison has been researching men's issues since her mother gave her "Princess at the Window" by Donna Laframboise in 1994 when she was 16. She's taken part in men's rights communities since she started posting on soc.men in 2003. Since 2011 she's run the gender apostate blog Genderratic with her pal Gingko the wonder leaf and she founded Honey Badger Brigade in 2013 with Hannah Wallen and Karen Straughan. According to Vice the pony she most resembles is Fluttershy.
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  • Druk

    I think social murder is more apt, especially since it often ends in physical murder.

  • http://dannyscorneroftheuniverse.blogspot.com Danny

    All based solely on a woman’s testimony. Despite the lack of physical evidence, despite the implausibility, despite the inconsistencies of the tall tale, Brian Banks was not exonerated until he’d served his full sentence and recorded his rapist fessing up to her crime.
    Here’s something that bugs me a bit.

    On one hand we have article after article and post after post going on about how no one believes rape (female) victims and that we should “believe the (female) victim”. On the other we have cases like this where a man can quite literally be convicted on nothing more than a woman saying she was raped.

    Both of these things happen at the same time and you can find plenty of stories of both.

    How does it happen that way?

    How can you have one article talking about how no one listens to (female) victims but then have another talking about how men are getting put away based on the accuser’s word?

  • Sans-sanity

    @Danny,
    I was thinking about this the other day. It goes a long with stories from single moms who can’t get a cent out of their children’s fathers, and fathers who are hounded to the ends of the earth by collectors; stories about children who are taken away from good parents for ridiculously trivial reasons by child protective services, and children who are abandoned to obvious abuse, stories from men who have restrinaing orders taken out against them based on nothing, and women who get told by police that their hands are tied and there’s nothing that can be done.

    Different people hold different prejudices, different areas create different circumstances, and different injustices flourish readily as neighbours.

    It’s all a bit of a shit, and it highlights the importance of having compassion for all victims, and not just the ones our lives and experiences allow us to most readily empathise with.

  • Tamerlame

    I don’t believe most females when they tell me they are rape victims. When a women is not listened too, it is most likely because her story is far fetched and the police ignore it.

    I’ve been looking round rape survivor groups on the internet, I think at least 50% of the stories are made up by the women, they seem to get off on the thought of being overpowered and taken.

    The fact that I can’t believe women over this unless I know the very well and can vouch for their character worries me. I think our culture is full of insane women.

  • typhonblue

    @ Danny

    “Both of these things happen at the same time and you can find plenty of stories of both.”

    A lot of the “women wasn’t believed” stories turn out to have really good reasons for why the woman wasn’t believed and/or complete fictions from the get go. I’ve noticed this with every single one of these stories championed by feminists. Look a little deeper and there was good reason why their interpretation of events is wrong.

    Duke Lacross. And all of the recent other outragasms that have swept through the social justice sphere. They all are about rubbing one out on the affirmation of your world view/anger towards “the patriarchy” than anything actually factual. At this point every time I hear one I’m counting down to the time when the facts reveal the exact opposite of what the SJWs are saying.

    The only way to get rid of these “woman wasn’t believed” stories would be to make an accusation a conviction when the defendant is a man and the accuser is a woman. They’re essentially people freaking out about the existence of due process in situations where men are accused of some sort of aggression against women.

    As for the situations where DNA exonerates an innocent man, or a man gets convicted based on the flimsiest of evidence… the facts are the facts.

    @Sans-sanity

    I’m also inclined not to believe the whole “he doesn’t pay” issue. 1) Statistically more men than women pay their child support even though women owe less. 2) Statistically men who can pay do pay; most men who default have no ability to pay. 3) Statistically men with access to their children are more likely to pay. 4) Governments budget about 200 times more for retrieving child support than enforcing visitation.

    So the reality is that the most likely scenario is that the father is 1) poor, 2) not able to see his kids and also 3) she’s the beneficiary of 200 times more effort on the government’s part to get her money than he is to ensure his visitation.

    Anecdotes accentuate STATISTICS and FACTs and statistics and facts are definitely not on the side of the people saying “women aren’t believed” or “men don’t pay child support.”

    Finally Child Protective Services is an abomination.

  • Sans-sanity

    @ Typhonblue, Yes, I agree with all of that, the national parents organization gives a good run down of those numbers here: https://nationalparentsorganization.org/blog/21375-census-bureau-fathers-better-at-paying-child-support-than-mothers

    Something worth noting though is that only aroud 56% of custodial mothers have a child support order (which is still a damned sight better than the 28.8% of custodial fathers). Which puts just under half of custodial mothers in the ‘can’t get a cent’ camp. The reasons for the lack of orders probably vary from ‘she never asked’, to ‘recognition of inability to pay’, to ‘is in fact dead’.

    As for the great big splashy SJW cases, yeah, I basically disbelieve those from the get go as well. Reality rarley fits the feminist narrative, so when it looks like it does, it’s a good sign someone’s misrepresenting ‘reality’. Most of the time I wind up right.

    “Finally Child Protective Services is an abomination.”

    Amen

  • typhonblue

    @Sans-sanity

    I’d rather give children the legal option to run away to some sort of communal facility.

    The reality is that if the home environment is reasonably non-toxic the kid will be back within a couple days at most.

  • Tamerlame

    I grew up with an emotional abusive mother and the care system. Care system is not any better than an abusive home.

    Social workers blatantly let my mum abuse and neglect me. She even threw me out on the street multiple times without punishment. She falsely phoned the police on me for violence. (She basically put me in the abusive spouse role, even though I was not abusive.) Police thugs where willing to take a boy from 10 year old upwards to the police station on my mothers word. I even started to get charged for stupid things like threats to kill.

    The only way to do anything about this is for society to punish abusive neglectful mothers.

  • http://,askingforhelpallthetimeandgettingnoe;shedoesitallonherownandthenwhenthebreadisreadysuddenlyeveryoneisinterestedinhelpinghereatit. Ginkgo

    “On one hand we have article after article and post after post going on about how no one believes rape (female) victims and that we should “believe the (female) victim”. On the other we have cases like this where a man can quite literally be convicted on nothing more than a woman saying she was raped.”

    Danny, funny you should say that. Alabama had to pass a law to exonerate the Scottsboro Boys because being dead, they can’t be pardoned.

    So that’s what happens when a man is destroyed on a woman’s word. When a rapist goes unpunished on a man’s word, the consequences are nowhere as severe – unless of course one is the kind of sexist pig that equates the destruction of a man’s life and liberty with a woman’s failure to get vengeance.

  • http://,askingforhelpallthetimeandgettingnoe;shedoesitallonherownandthenwhenthebreadisreadysuddenlyeveryoneisinterestedinhelpinghereatit. Ginkgo

    Tamerlane, your story is a glaring example of hyperagency/hypoagency in action – a10 y/o boy considered a threat to a grown woman, and her active harms to him ignored because she’s a woman, she cain’t hurt nobody….

    Would you consider writing it up in more detail to post here? As I say, it illustrates a number of important points.

  • Sans-sanity

    A few years ago there was a proposed law in my state to make sheltering runaways a crime (not hiding them, just letting them physically stay with you). The idea was that it was supposed to stop people taking advantage of teenage tantees. Thankfully it got dropped when they realised it would criminalise helping kids escape abuse. How they didn’t see that from the get go I have no idea.

  • John D

    Sans-sanity.
    Another contributing factor to the 44% of custodial mothers who may not have orders is: “inability to identify father” in the case of anonymous hookups (no last names given and they don’t run in same social circles).

    I was just watching Maury and a woman was on for her SECOND time to identify paternity of her child. Paternity tests were done on 4 men, and NONE of them were the father.

    I don’t know how many men they tested on her first visit.